Federal HR in the News: What You Need to Know



Federal HR in the News

The federal people management landscape shifts quickly and must respond to the waves of demands from the federal workforce as well as the impact of events that happen outside of the Beltway Bubble. Add on the myriad of competing priorities and it can be challenging to stay atop of the latest happenings impacting teams. 

With this in mind, we’ve compiled a rundown of the latest headlines that discuss the Federal HR landscape.

  1. Federal Employee Health Programs Are ‘Essential Services’ During Future Shutdowns, OPM Says
    Federal News Network discusses the OPM’s new draft regulations published on 7/20 that designate all federal employee health programs as “essential” amid government shutdowns. Read more to learn which services will not be interrupted during any future cessations.
  2. More Than 39,000 Federal Employees Have Tested Positive for COVID-19
    Government Executive breaks down agency data revealing that more than 39,000 federal employees have tested positive for COVID-19. Here’s how the process of employees returning to the office is impacting the health of various agencies.
  3. Senator Asks Agencies How They Are Protecting Federal Employees When Reopening
    FedSmith gives an inside look at Senator Gary Peters’ letters to numerous agencies asking for details on their plans to re-open offices safely amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Take a look at this article to find out exactly what information is being requested.
  4. Federal Contractors Describe Onboarding in the Age of Coronavirus
    Federal News Network highlights the discussion held at Washington Technology’s Virtual Power Breakfast panel on 7/17 where representatives of federal contractors shared their experiences with virtual onboarding. Here’s why this technological shift may be considered the new normal. 

For more federal HR news including COVID-19 updates, workforce changes, pay and benefits, and more, follow Acendre on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.



Back To List